1 p.m. update: Flood watch issued until late tonight | NevadaAppeal.com

1 p.m. update: Flood watch issued until late tonight

Nevada Appeal staff report

What to do

Be prepared and never drive into flood waters.

Government entities have urged residents to not leave their house until the storm has passed.

Before a flood:

Water: At least a three-day supply (one gallon per person per day and extra if you have pets)

Food: At least a three-day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-prepare foods

Medications: At least a seven-day supply

Medical items: Hearing aids and batteries, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, canes or other walking assistance tools, items for people with disabilities

First aid kit

Flashlight with extra batteries

Rubber boots and rubber gloves

Copies of personal documents (medication lists, important medical information, deed/lease to home, birth and/or marriage certificates, insurance policies, etc.)

Cell phones and chargers

Family and emergency contact information

Extra cash

Extra blankets, clothing, and shoes

Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)

Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, water, carrier, bowl, blankets, toys)

Be prepared in case there’s a power outage, have electronic devices charged

Extra sets of vehicle and house keys

Priceless items or valuables

Rain gear

Camera for photos of damage

A NOAA weather radio which receives broadcast alerts directly from the National Weather Service

During a flood:

Listen to the TV and/or radio for flood warnings and reports of flooding

Take advantage of sandbags if your home/business is in a flood prone area — be prepared, as these take longer to fill than you might think

If you have a basement, make sure your sump pump is working, consider a backup battery operated one if necessary

Clear debris from gutters or downspouts

Cautiously clear small items out of waterways, anything bigger than a tumbleweed should be removed by an emergency service person

Anchor any fuel tanks and outdoor furniture

Move important documents and valuables to a safe place

Be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice

When a flood or flash flood warning is issued for your area, head for higher ground and stay there

Don’t try to walk in flood waters, just six inches is enough to knock you down

Don’t try to cross a flooded road, turn around and find an alternative route. Most cars can be swept away by less than two feet of water

Keep children out of the water

Be especially cautious at night when it’s harder to recognize potential dangers

Know your evacuation routes (several may need to be identified) and have a place to stay

Ensure your vehicle has a full tank of gas and is ready to go if you need to leave an area quickly

If you don’t have a place to go, contact the city to determine where evacuation shelters are located

Establish a communication plan with family — determine ahead of time where you will meet or go if you should get separated

Use text messaging or social media to let friends and family know you’re safe

If you should happen to get trapped in a building, vehicle, or outdoors during a flood, get to the highest spot you can and try to signal or call for help.

After a flood:

Only return home when officials have declared the area safe

Shut off utilities until it can be determined they don’t pose a risk

Use flashlights, not lanterns, torches, or matches to examine buildings, as open flames may cause a fire or explosion if gases have been leaking

Before entering your home, look for loose power lines, damaged gas lines, foundation cracks, or other damage

If you smell natural or propane gas or hear a hissing noise, leave immediately and call the fire department

If parts of your home are collapsed or damaged, approach carefully

During cleanup, wear protective clothing, rubber gloves, and rubber boots

Be especially cautious of mold, asbestos, or lead paint contamination

If food or water have come into contact with floodwater, discard these items

Work with your insurance company if you have flood insurance

Let people know you’re safe

Unfortunately we can’t prevent floods, but we can prepare for them. By having a plan in place and communicating that with people closest to you will help ensure peace of mind and safety.

List provided by Lindsay Chichester, extension educator with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.

Cause

The storm is what is referred to as an “atmospheric river.” The National Weather Service says that can be defined as a conveyor belt of vapor that extends thousands of miles from out at sea, carrying as much water as what could fill 15 Mississippi rivers.

Because of the magnitude of the storm, the Carson City Board of Supervisors signed a resolution declaring a state of emergency on Thursday. This is based on the dollar amount of damage sustained during a crisis, which will make available additional funding and state resources to help during and after a catastrophe hits.

The resolution was brought to board in advance because the board was already assembled at the first of its two monthly meetings. The resolution won’t be submitted to the state until if and when the city spends $193,459 on supplies, equipment and personnel, the threshold for asking for assistance from the state, said Stacey Belt, Carson City deputy emergency manager.

Lyon, Storey, Douglas and Washoe counties also all have declared a state of emergency.

A power line is reported down at Musser and Mountain streets as the wind gusts pickup this afternoon. The downed power line has caused stop lights to go out. Please use caution.
Carson City also has reported water over the roadway on Curry and Carson street because the “storm drain is overwhelmed in the area.”
384 Carson City NV Energy residents are without power; 7,399 are without power in Douglas County and 1,030 customers are without power in Lyon County.

Lyon County manager Jeff Page says: “South Lyon County (Yerington, Mason Valley, and Smith Valley) is experiencing sustained winds. 95A from Yerington is experiencing low visibility and has been temporarily restricted to travel. County Roads connecting to that portion of 95A are also restricted
•••
A flood watch is in effect from 10 a.m. until late Thursday for western Nevada including Carson City and Douglas County according to the National Weather Service.
Heavy rainfall is expected to develop today and continue through this evening. The rain may result in areas of flooding and rock slide.
The areas most heavily impacted are urban areas and along creeks, streams and poor drainage areas.
The Carson River is currently at 7.71 feet. It is expected to rise to 9.8 feet, very close to minor flooding areas. In January, the river reached 11 feet.

High winds, with gusts up to 80 miles per hour are possible today. Carson City said Wednesday that the city’s storm drain system is surcharged, and storm water is coming out of the drains onto the streets near the downtown. Please slow down and be cautious when driving on streets that have water over the roadway.
The following roads remain closed:
• Rhodes Street is closed from Carson Street to Curry Street, except to local business traffic.
• A 100 foot section of Combs Canyon Road that’s 1/8 of a mile south of the Lakeview Road intersection — travel is reduced to one lane, please use caution and yield to oncoming traffic. Residents are advised to use the Highway 395 egress/ingress for the Lakeview subdivision.
Carson City Public Works encourages residents to visit http://www.carson.org to stay up-to-date on the weather, road closures, trail/path closures, sandbag locations and resources that are deployed across the city. Additional public information that’s released will be posted to the City website flood page.
A Flood Hotline has been designated for flood related reporting and questions, which are not life-threatening. The number is (775) 887-2355 and officials ask the public to use this number instead of 9-1-1 for non-emergency flood calls.
Please be watchful of City crews working as they continue to mitigate and assess storm damage.

In Douglas County, the East Fork of the Carson River rose high enough to send water into the low lying areas of Aspen Mobile Home Park in Gardnerville, but not as high as it was in January. No one has been evacuated, according to last report, The Record-Courier reported.

However, the rise came to within 2 feet of flood stage on the East Fork and raises the concern about what will happen today and Friday should snow levels continue to rise.

Workers digging up the water line on Romans Road in Indian Hills found a 20-foot stick of 12-inch pipe that had split. They’ll be digging that up today, which means no water for Sierra Lutheran High School again. No word from the school on whether they’ll try to open.

•••

For safety, the Nevada Department of Transportation has closed U.S. 50 in the Cave Rock area of Lake Tahoe following five large boulders falling onto the roadway.

During the past three days, boulders roughly the size of large passenger vehicles fell from a roadside slope onto eastbound travel lanes. For safety, travel lanes have been reduced to one lane in each direction since Tuesday, with both directions of traffic shifted to westbound lanes away from the rock fall area.

No vehicles were involved in the slides, and no injuries were reported. The rock fall occurred near Logan Creek Drive north of Cave Rock.

The likelihood of rockslides, mudslides and avalanches in mountainous areas continues to be high as Mother Nature drops more snow in the mountains and rain on the valley floors.

The National Weather Service said Wednesday afternoon, another strong atmospheric river storm will impact the region today through Saturday. Significant travel impacts are expected due to strong winds, heavy rain, additional flooding, and more high elevation mountain snow.

Most heavy snowfall will be above 8,000 feet with snow levels not reaching Lake Tahoe level until Friday afternoon. The snow is expected to reach the valley floors by Saturday morning. Snow totals are expected to be 1-2 feet above 8,000 feet with up to 3 feet along the Sierra crest. Winds were expected to be between 70 and 90 mph in wind-prone areas.

Minimal snow accumulations are expected in western Nevada.

The Carson River was nearing flood stage at 7.23 feet Wednesday. The river was expected to rise to 9.3 feet today and stay there until Saturday morning.

Most area creeks and streams are already at capacity and mainstem rivers in northeastern California are already at flood stage or forecast to reach moderate to major flood levels.

“After a very active winter conditions are ripe for widespread flooding impacts as the region can no longer sustain heavy rainfall,” said the National Weather Service.

Carson City staff expected periods of heavy rain beginning late Wednesday, early this morning. In addition to the rain, the city is expected to experience high winds, with gusts between 70-80 miles per hour.

The City’s storm drain system is surcharged, and storm water is coming out of the drains onto the streets near the downtown. Please slow down and be cautious when driving on streets that have water over the roadway.

Carson City Public Works encourages residents to visit http://www.carson.org to stay up-to-date on the weather, road closures, trail/path closures, sandbag locations and resources that are deployed across the city. Additional public information that’s released will be posted to the City website flood page.

A Flood Hotline has been designated for flood related reporting and questions, which are not life-threatening. The number is (775) 887-2355 and officials ask the public to use this number instead of 9-1-1 for non-emergency flood calls.

Please be watchful of City crews working as they continue to mitigate and assess storm damage.

January’s flood damage caused at least $1.67 million in damage to the city’s parks and recreation facilities, the Parks and Recreation Commission was told Tuesday.

The hardest hit were Riverview Park trails, which incurred about $612,000 in damages, Steve Brunner, deputy director, Parks, Recreation & Open Space, told the Parks and Recreation Commission Tuesday.

Other affected areas include Empire Ranch Estates Park, hit with $315,000 in damages; Riverview Trail, assessed at $186,000; and the Linear Ditch Trail with $150,000 in needed repairs.

Governors Field and Pete Livermore Sports Complex suffered $40,000 and $32,000 in damages, respectively.

“Our high priority is to make the fields at sports complexes safe for the kids who use them,” starting this month or next, said Jennifer Budge, director, Parks and Rec.

Budge said she expected further erosion and damage from this week’s floods.

She also cautioned hikers eager to get back on the trails to be careful.

“Really use caution on trails. Make sure you’re with someone, have a phone with you, and tell someone where you’re going,” Budge said.

As for Lyon County, officials urge the public to keep all flood mitigation efforts in place. Sandbag locations have been left open since the January event. Crews continue to monitor roads and drainages and will continue to report any problems. There have been no reported fatalities or injuries and no evacuations are in place.

Many roads in Dayton, Stagecoach and Silver Springs had substantial water flowing down them.

Lyon County urges citizens not to call 9-1-1 or dispatch unless they’re experiencing a life threatening emergency. Call 463-6531 and leave a message if your call can’t be answered or email your road damage to flood@lyon-county.org.

In Tahoe, NDOT said the large boulders near Cave Rock remain perched on the destabilized roadside slope, and the temporary road closure is a safety precaution. The road will be reopened once deemed safe.

To enhance traffic safety, NDOT has placed two rows of concrete barrier rail on the closed eastbound side of the roadway to help capture any additional boulders before sliding into traffic. A sloped berm of gravel will be placed behind the barrier rail to help further diffuse and prevent rock fall onto travel lanes.

With traffic safety a priority, NDOT dedicated approximately $15 million to enhancing traffic safety by stabilizing roadside slopes to reduce rockslide and other erosion in U.S. 50 at Tahoe. The majority of U.S. 50 roadside slopes in the Glenbrook area have already been stabilized with rock fall netting or reinforced roadside slopes or have barrier rail/wall built at the bottom to contain and collect erosion-related rock fall. Last year, NDOT also extended the westbound, lakeside Cave Rock tunnel entrance. The new approximately 60-foot long and 27-foot tall structure extends the previous tunnel.

to enhance safety by catching rock fall before it reaches the roadway.

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY HIT HARD

Around the region, nearly 5 inches of rain fell in a 12-hour span in the San Joaquin Valley, swamping roads and swelling waterways to critical levels, according to The Associated Press

Authorities said an earthen dam on Lewis Forks south of Yosemite National Park was in imminent danger of failing, and downstream residents in the rural Cedar Valley area should be ready to evacuate.

To the north, officials shut down water flow from a dam in Butte County after chunks of concrete went flying off the spillway, creating a 200-foot-long, 30-foot-deep hole.

The Department of Water Resources said the erosion at Lake Oroville does not pose a threat to the earthen dam or public safety, and the reservoir has plenty of capacity to handle the continuing rain.

The weather service said the storms were part of a “classic pineapple express,” referring to an atmospheric river phenomenon that carries moisture across the Pacific Ocean from Hawaii and dumps it on Northern California. It could deliver even more rain starting today, forecasters predicted.

“If the model guidance is correct this next system could be even juicier moisture wise as it has a decent tropical connection,” according to a weather service statement.