Wiley seeks to upset Reid for Senate | NevadaAppeal.com
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Wiley seeks to upset Reid for Senate

Geoff Dornan/Nevada AppealRepublican Mike Wiley has entered the race for U.S. Senate.
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Mike Wiley is one of 10 Republicans seeking the right to challenge Harry Reid for U.S. Senate.

He says he can beat former state Senator Sue Lowden, the front-runner, and the rest of the field in Nevada this cycle and take Reid’s seat in the general.

“I’m intelligent. I know finance and business, how to make decisions and lead,” said Wiley, of Las Vegas. “With the situation government is in, you need to have some one like that.”

His experience includes success in Orlando, Fla., and Boston as a talk radio host and as a campaign spokesman for Pat Buchanan when Buchanan surprised George Bush in 1992 by winning the New Hampshire

primary.

“The nation is in a serious situation, on the brink of financial abyss,” Wiley said adding that returning the same people to Washington won’t fix anything.

He said more than half the people in the U.S. Senate are millionaires.

“I don’t know that they have the best interests of the people in mind,” he said.

Wiley said to provide real stimulus to the economy, he would give business and people a 90-day tax holiday.

“That would give the economy a jolt and the debt of it doesn’t matter because we’re already in extreme debt. Companies could do things like pay their bills. It puts money in people’s pockets.”

On health care, he said government doesn’t have the authority to tax people or businesses for not providing health care. As for the “public option,” Wiley said government can’t manage Medicare so he doesn’t see how it would manage an expanded health care program.

He said he favors “running Yucca Mountain safely.”

Wiley said he has an advantage over most of the other GOP candidates because he can attract union, blue collar voters.

“I’m the son and grandson of Teamsters,” he said. “This is a very winnable race. In my case it’s a matter of getting people to hear me speak.”

Wiley said he hopes to have $150,000 in the bank by the Jan. 31 deadline for filing his next campaign contributions report with the Federal Elections Commission.