Nevada official says scammers eyeing stimulus checks before they’re sent | NevadaAppeal.com

Nevada official says scammers eyeing stimulus checks before they’re sent

Nevada Appeal Capitol Bureau

Attorney General Aaron Ford is warning Nevadans that scammers are already plotting ways to cheat Americans out of their stimulus checks.

The legislation, which has yet to clear Congress and be signed by President Trump, includes up to $1,200 per person and up to $2,400 per married couple depending on income.

Ford said people must be very wary about phone or social media messages requesting personal or financial information in exchange for so-called immediate stimulus money. He said they may ask for Social Security numbers and other information to qualify for a payment.

“Every day, scammers are finding new ways to impersonate real businesses and agencies and to trick Nevadans,” he said.

He said his bureau of Consumer Protection advises people avoid giving anyone access to your bank account and that only scammers will ask for Social Security, bank account and other numbers such as credit and debit card information.

The bureau also suggests checking your mailbox frequently to keep some one from stealing a physical stimulus check and don’t share personal information with any person or website that asks for that information related to a stimulus package.

Anyone who believes they have been victimized can file a complaint with the Attorney General’s office at http://ag.nv.gov/Complaints/File_Complaint/ or by calling 888-434-9989.