Guy W. Farmer: A major drug bust in Reno | NevadaAppeal.com

Guy W. Farmer: A major drug bust in Reno

Guy W. Farmer

Chad Lundquist/Nevada Appeal

While clueless and/or naive "open borders" advocates were marching in downtown Reno late last month to protest our immigration laws, Nevada's U.S. Attorney was filing major drug trafficking charges against 20 people who look a lot like Latin American gang-bangers. One of the arrestees, Jose' Mora-Silva, of Reno, was charged with being an illegal immigrant in unlawful possession of a firearm.

According to reliable law enforcement sources, those arrested in last month's major drug bust are probably affiliated with Mexican drug cartels and/or the ultra-violent, Central America-based MS-13 gang. Although the Feds won't reveal how many of the drug trafficking gang-bangers are illegal immigrants, it's safe to assume most of them are "undocumented," to use the politically correct term for illegals.

These are the people open borders advocates don't want to talk about. The amnesty march in downtown Reno made page one of the Reno Gazette-Journal while the huge drug bust was played on page three. Such is life in Mayor Hillary Schieve's "welcoming city" to our north.

Apparently, this case has been "classified" by the Feds because the investigation is continuing. Nevertheless, I'm not going to wait for them to finish their investigation before warning my readers about the serious threat violent gang-bangers pose to law-abiding residents, including Hispanics, of the Reno/Tahoe area.

"These indictments are the latest example of our steadfast commitment to fighting drug trafficking and reducing violent crime in Nevada's communities," said U.S. Attorney Dayle Elieson. "We are committed to protecting Nevadans and making our communities safe." A 14-count indictment alleges "all of the suspects conspired with each other to distribute large amounts of illegal drugs" in the Reno area during a five-month span between January and June.

Aaron Rouse, special agent in charge of the FBI's Reno office, credited the Bureau's Northern Nevada Safe Streets Task Force with making the case against the drug trafficking ring in cooperation with state and local authorities. "As a result of our large-scale operation, a well-organized drug trafficking operation has effectively been dismantled," Rouse said.

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Federal, state and local authorities seized nearly 20 pounds of methamphetamine worth more than $300,000 during their investigation. The felony drug trafficking charges carry maximum penalties of life in prison plus fines up to $10 million. I hope the judge throws the book at these criminal illegals after they're convicted in court. Specific charges involve conspiracy to possess and distribute large quantities of meth, cocaine and heroin, plus federal firearms charges.

These are the kinds of people who are protected from prosecution by misguided "sanctuary cities" like San Francisco, Seattle and Portland. These cities, among many others, refuse to cooperate with federal authorities in the apprehension and prosecution of "undocumented" immigrants who are charged with felonies like drug trafficking and rape. That's why Schieve should be rebuked when she describes Reno as a "welcoming" (i.e. sanctuary) city.

Some left-wing "progressives" have gone even further, calling for open borders and the abolition of ICE, the federal agency charged with enforcing our immigration laws. Progressive candidates who run on those absurd policy proposals can expect to suffer resounding defeats at the polls this fall.

Police also arrested three suspects — Jamil Geronimo, Tyler Hernandez and Quentin Moore — in a fatal shooting in the Galena area south of Reno late last month. I'd sure like to know the immigration status of Geronimo and Hernandez. In fact, I think illegal immigrants should be identified every time they're arrested for major crimes as gang activity increases in Northern Nevada. Let's combat the open borders advocates and get serious about illegal immigration.

Guy W. Farmer worked on anti-drug programs in seven countries during his diplomatic career.