Past Pages for August 26 to 28, 2020 | NevadaAppeal.com
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Past Pages for August 26 to 28, 2020

By Trent Dolan

Wednesday

150 years ago

The Capitol Building is an assured fact. Inside of three weeks the walls will be finished —they are already being prepared for the reception of the cornices. That the contractor, Mr. Cavanaugh, will not only have it finished in readiness for the occupation of the legislature, but for the use and occupancy of state officials, is beyond any cause for apprehension or doubt.

140 years ago

An Acrostic. — A young lady sends the Appeal a thrilling account of the death of her pet canary bird Buttercup and accompanies her note with an acrostic. We fully appreciate the lady’s sorrow for her lost bird, but decline publishing the touching acrostic from a desire to spare the readers of the paper from additional grief which the poem would be sure to cause.

130 years ago

Ducks are appearing in large quantities at the Carson River, as the breeding grounds have been well supplied with water the whole year round.

120 years ago

A small Indian boy, a new arrival, left the Indian school yesterday morning. Although the school officials and a large number of pupils were searching for him, he was not to be found up to a late hour last night. He was barefooted, wore a check shirt and slouch hat. Any information concerning him will be gladly received by the Superintendent.

100 years ago

Edward E. Oase of Ely, Nev., won third place and gold medal in the national individual rifle match, held at Camp Perry, Ohio, August 23rd, against a field of 2,000 competitors. 

Thursday 

150 years ago

Ginn At Unionville. — The Silver State of Friday last says that John I. Ginn ‘assumes the editorial stool.’ To make a clean thing of that assumption of his, we trust his patrons will furnish him with ample supply of paper. — White Pine News

140 years ago

Remembering the Orphans. — Messrs. Sweeney and Allen, lessees of Treadway’s Ranch, have sent an invitation to the children of the Orphan’s Home to attend the circus at their expense. There is good stuff in the men who will put their hands down in their pockets and give the orphans a couple of hours of solid enjoyment. 

130 years ago

From the fact that the sagehens are six weeks behind in their hatching and numerous other signs, the Indians predict a short mild winter.

120 years ago

Yesterday Washoe Johnny, the wise man and weather sharp of the Washoe tribe, was discovered opposite this office deeply interested in a poker game. He passed the “buck” until he was broke and then rolled over for a sleep. He was disturbed by a reporter, and unlike the white man, was even good natured when awakened. “What do you think of the weather, Johnny,” was asked. “Heap snow. No pinenuts last year no snow. You see plenty coyote, he come to campoodie cry all time. Guess he think lots snow pretty quick.”

100 years ago

Gets Another Tilt. It was announced today that gasoline had received another upward jolt, registering at the 40 cents per gallon mark. Standard Oil must be preparing for more philanthropic work.

Friday

150 years ago

Returned from their Jaunt. — Judges Whitman and Lewis and their wives and jaunting companions have just returned from their trip to Hope Valley and the localities thereabout, all looking as brown as berries and as hearty as bears.

140 years ago

A Lusty Buck. — About 7 o’clock last evening the police found three Indians, all pretty drunk, fighting in front of Olcovich’s store. When they saw the officers approach two fled, but the third faced the police defiantly, and when officer Stern grabbed him, he knocked the policeman down. Two more officers threw themselves on the savage and for a while there was lively fight all around. The Indian was a perfect Hercules, and it took the three men some time to overpower and take him to the station house.

130 years ago

The mail system between here and Virginia City is abominable, and complaints as to the way the Virginia office is run are numerous. Cases are known where letters have laid from three to five days in the office notwithstanding the fact that application for such letters were made daily.

120 years ago

Mammoth Cave. A party from Lovelock recently visited that cave and spent nearly a week in in an outing in Star Canyon. L.N. Marker, in describing the cave said it was one of the greatest wonders he had ever beheld. The cave is on incline and goes down into the mountain. The opening is near the top of the mountain in a lime cliff. It is supposed that the entire cave is in lime as is the one in Kentucky. Marker said they went down into the cave a quarter mile, but that Mr. Woolcock told hime he had been down for fully a mile and not reached the bottom.—Lovelock Tribune

100 years ago

Few, if any, of the tourists who have come and gone from Carson City the current season have departed with aught but kind words splendidly expressed feelings for the treatment of courtesies received. This has been expressed in various ways.

Trent Dolan is the son of Bill Dolan, who wrote this column for the Nevada Appeal from 1947 until his death in 2006.