Past Pages for January 6 to 8, 2021 | NevadaAppeal.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Past Pages for January 6 to 8, 2021

By Sue Ballew

Wednesday

145 Years Ago

Carabaraba at the theater: The mysterious little wizard comes here with this cabalastic name and who we have no doubt is a veritable relative of the Demon of the Nile and the Guyascutus of the river Styx and is the cleverest sleight of hand performer we have seen. His tricks at cards are clever as is his rope and shawl trick. He uses no paraphernalia, no machinery or blue lights and it is all simple, neat and effective.



140 Years Ago

Smallpox: Dr. L. A. Herrick has constantly on hand a fresh supply of Bovine Virus, right from the heifer, propagated at Sacramento, Cal. The Doctor will keep this virus in sufficient quantity to supply physicians and families. One dollar for ten points—price charged in San Francisco. Warranted to be pure.



130 Years Ago

Roll of honor in Miss Martin’s class: Christie Fraser, Tump Mara, Edith Jones, Dollie Gray, Emma Frechette, John Moore, Ivy Millard, Naomi Keith, George Viera, Charles Southworth, Pearl Cowing, Josie Burke, George Vonderhyde, David Logan, Harford Southworth, Etta Bullock, Nettie Lynch (Willie Lynch’s daughter), Mattie Johnson, Lowe McClure, Horace Meder, Lola Vonderhyde, Ethel Millard.

120 Years Ago

Kitzmeyer furniture business: Geo. E. Kitzmeyer purchased the entire G W. Kitzmeyer furniture business on January 2, 1901 and will conduct the same in connection with his undertaking business from this date on.

110 Years Ago

Orphan train: Fifty-two babies from the New York foundling asylum are being shipped to Texas, where each one will be adopted by responsible families. The carload of little folks have bright prospects before them in the southland.

100 Years Ago

Prisoners escape: Two prisoners of the Washoe county jail escaped some time Saturday night and have not yet been captured. It is said that the two, with a number of others, were furnished liquor by the jailer and after making a night of it left the jail for parts unknown. The jailer has been arrested for violating the prohibition law.

Thursday

145 Years Ago

Ball: There will be a Ball at the Yellow Jacket House at Empire on January 14 at Mr. James Hope’s place, the Yellow Jacket House. This will be a very pleasant and attractive party. Everything within the range of the imperial possibilities of Empire will be held subject to the demands of the patrons of this ball.

140 Years Ago

Advertisement: “Attraction Extraordinary! Moore’s Theater, Saturday evening, January 8. Positively No Ladies Admitted. Mademoiselle Albern, the handsomest formed woman on earth, will appear in Living Art Pictures! H. D. Goodwin, America’s greatest of all Clog Dancer; George Williams, the great Dutch Specialty Artist and Comedian Morris Hadley, Comedian and King Laugh Maker; Mademoiselle Abern, the beautiful female model artist—voluptuous—beauty. The Temple of Art open at 7 p.m. Admission $1.00.

130 Years Ago

All sorts: There is no theatrical attraction booked for Carson for some weeks. Powder has gone up; the California Powder Works have exploded. There is plenty of skating now at Treadway’s pond. 

120 Years Ago

All sorts: Ross Wilson, who has been laid up with mumps, was at his store. Good sleighing can be had on the Comstock. The vertical system of writing is being abandoned in New York for the reason that it is responsible for very slow penmanship. 

110 Years Ago

Park Theater: Playing at the Park Theatre is the Biograph of “In Life’s Cycle,” “A Plucky American Girl,” “A Westerner’s Way,” and “The Three of Them.”

100 Years Ago

From Marlette: Billy Harris, watchman at Marlette lake, says that forty-five inches of hard snow is on the ground at the lake. An early storm practically filled the reservoir, and the winter snows will act as a reserve.

Friday

145 Years Ago

Observatory: In Carson we have a complete astronomical observatory supplied with meridian transit, etc. There under the same scientific roof are Green’s barometer, thermometers and the like; rain gauges and all apparatus complete for taking accurate meteorological observations. This is Friend’s sanctum where we promise a visit.

140 Years Ago

Travel to the Lake: Travel to Lake Tahoe is not suspended though somewhat impeded by the snow. Sleighs come and go—Clear Creek way—every day.

Leap Year: The Ladies’ Leap Year Party is going to be a very great success. It is to be a fancy dress ball, and the ladies do all the inviting. 

130 Years Ago

All sorts: There are now eleven patients at the County Poor Farm, and all are getting along nicely under the kind treatment of Mr. Abraham.

120 Years Ago

Smallpox in Virginia City: It is known that a well-developed case of smallpox exists in the family of John D. Cameron. His son “broke out”, but it was not definitely decided what his ailment was. Dr. Pickard pronounced it smallpox. Mr. Cameron had been attending the University at Reno and was home to spend the holidays. Because there is great danger of the spread of the disease, the residence was placed in quarantine, and no one will be allowed to approach the premises until danger of contagion is passed.

110 Years Ago

Advertisement: “The Park Hotel” formerly the Ormsby House is headquarters for the commercial traveler because it is central, good and clean, with clean sample rooms. Special rates by week or month. Free bus to all trains. Meals 25 cents. Bar in connection. Joe Rochon, Proprietor, Carson City, Nevada.

100 Years Ago

Feathered fighters: Feathered fighters, a product of the world war, now meet their true appreciation. The American carrier pigeon is a member of the enlisted personnel of the United States Navy. They are being registered on the air-station muster in a way similar to that of recording personnel attached to the station. Every bird has his number. All seaplanes while in flight must carry pigeons aboard. No details are overlooked in giving the birds the attention that their position warrants. During the last ten months of war, United States Naval pigeons delivered 219 messages from seaplanes forced to land at sea. There was no other means of communication, and credit is given to the pigeons for saving both men and machines. 

Sue Ballew is the daughter of Bill Dolan, who wrote this column for the Nevada Appeal from 1947 until his death in 2006.