Past Pages for September 19 to 22, 2020 | NevadaAppeal.com
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Past Pages for September 19 to 22, 2020

By Sue Ballew

Saturday

150 Years Ago

Hurdy Gurdy House: A lively fight occurred in town. Two men who had been up all night were gambling when one attempted to play a foul hand. Some hard names were called, and the man being a Southerner replied that he was from a section of country where people cut and shoot. The other said he was from Maine where people stand up for their rights. A fight ensued, furniture was broken, walls marked with blood. The Southerner was thrown through a window. Both men escaped before Police officers arrived. 

140 Years Ago

Moonlight party: The ladies of the Episcopal Church will hold a moonlight party at Treadway’s Park. In addition to the moonlight there will be ice cream and other refreshments. The moonlight will cost 50 cents an acre and cheap enough to enjoyed by everybody.

130 Years Ago

All sorts: The Capitol lawn is as soft and smooth as a carpet.

Nearly all the colts in Mason Valley are suffering with distemper.

100 Years Ago

Lincoln Highway: The Lincoln Highway and Pioneer Trail route across “the plains” from the Missouri river to the Golden Gate is receiving the widest possible advertising with sixty films being exhibited. The films were taken by the Sunset-Burrud travelogue and feature especially the Pioneer route from Virginia City to Placerville. The story covered is that of a trip by two young ladies over the Pioneer Trail. (Mountain Democrat)

70 Years Ago

Birth: A son was born in Carson-Tahoe Hospital to Mr. and Mrs. William Cocking of Carson City—seven pounds, 10 ounces.

20 Years Ago

Top box office: A thriller about a serial killer called, “The Watcher,” starring Keanu Reeves, James Spader and Marisa Tomei, was the top box office movie bringing in $5.8 million. The top movies at North American theaters were: “The Watcher,” “Bait,” “Bring it On,” “Nurse Betty,” “Space Cowboys,” “The Cell,” “What Lies Beneath,” and “Almost Famous.”

Sunday

150 Years Ago

Pine nuts: The Indians have been coming through town in a southeasterly direction with women carrying huge conical shaped baskets to gather pine nuts found in abundance some sixteen miles from Carson.

140 Years Ago

Card of thanks: “The Rector, vestry and members of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church desire to thank Mr. Yerington and the officers of the V. & T. R.R., for restoring the church bell to its original sweetness of tone and replacing it in the tower of the church, without cost to the parish. Geo. R. Davis, Rector.”

130 Years Ago

All sorts: Neil Mahel, an employee of the Mexican Mill at Empire, caught a genuine silver trout weighing seven pounds.

George Givevich, Ernest Harris and John Mack returned from their hunting trip. Harris got three deer, Givevich got one, and Mack got—back.

100 Years Ago

Turn to the right: Traffic stops or signs have been placed at the intersections of the streets in Carson City leading north and south. This is to prevent accidents and follows specifications of all cities.

70 Years Ago

Classroom teachers elect officers: The Carson City classroom teacher’s association held their organizational meeting and elected officers: R. E. Walker, president; Forrest Brown, vice president; Ruby White, secretary-treasurer; committee heads are: Mrs. Virginia Swift, legislative; Mrs. Nellie Laird, professional growth; Forrest Brown, public relations and Mrs. Alpha H. Fifer, program.

20 Years Ago

Caption: Richard Kirkland, Director of the Department of Motor Vehicles and Public Safety, shows off one of over 200 firearms, knives and other weapons at the Parole and Probation office on Long Street in Carson City. The weapons were confiscated from felons regionally and will be melted down.

Tuesday

150 Years Ago

The State Capitol building status: The stone work of the walls and the foundation of the cupola is done. The roof will be erected in ten days, along with the cupola. The cupola will be, including the observatory and dome, forty seven and one half feet above the ridge of the roof. It will be surmounted by a flag-staff forty feet high.

140 Years Ago

A petrified woman: Alonzo Zaletto discovered a petrified woman at Cascade Lake. He investigated the matter and found a petrified hand. He had unearthed a woman in a complete state of petrifaction, small, brown, scrawny and emaciated. The petrification weighed two hundred pounds. He brought it down to Lake Bigler (Tahoe) and Mr. L. J. Wilson of San Francisco offered $100 for it. He wants to present it to the Academy of Science.

130 Years Ago

Washoe Lake: There will be a scarcity of fish during the next few years at the Lake because of the low water. The best fishing is in the tulles.

100 Years Ago

Candelaria comes back: Lucky Hill, a new mine, gives promise of proving as good at the Mt. Diablo and Argentum, with production estimated at between 20 and 50 million dollars. (Walker Lake Bulletin)

70 Years Ago

V & T movie: Gordon A. Sampson, vice president and general manager of the abandoned V & & T said that Esskay studios, an affiliate of Columbia Pictures, had finished its work with the V. & T. movie, “Roar of the Rails”, the picture that deals with the trials and tribulations in the construction of a pioneer railroad system. The engine No. 27, the last official train May 31, 1950, over from Reno, was in the picture as were four flat cars and a caboose. Cameras were focused in the Washoe City area.

20 Years Ago

Silver Saddle Ranch: Volunteers rolled up their sleeves to spruce up the Silver Saddle Ranch as part of National Public Lands Day. About 350 people helped with the projects, participated in a historical and education tour, had a barbecue lunch and entertainment.

Sue Ballew is the daughter of Bill Dolan, who wrote this column for the Nevada Appeal from 1947 until his death in 2006.