Sex offenders can be rehabilitated, too | NevadaAppeal.com

Sex offenders can be rehabilitated, too

I’m a sex offender who is currently serving a three-to-eight-year sentence for attempted sexual assault against my 12-year-old stepdaughter. I deeply regret my actions, not because I was caught but because I hurt a person who trusted me.

The last four years I’ve participated in numerous psych sexual therapy groups, anger and stress management, human relations and communication skill programs, all in an effort to explore why I acted out and how to prevent such actions from happening again.

I feel I can now understand society’s fear and point of view concerning sex offenders, but I don’t understand or agree with a July 13 letter to the editor. Castration may “curb” the urges of an offender, but it won’t change his belief system or thinking process, which is the true root of the problem. Also, putting people in prison forever won’t cure the crisis either. It’s only through education and therapy that we can be successful.

The writer goes on to say she doesn’t know why sex offenders’ rights supersede the rights of the children. I’m not sure which case she is referring to, but everybody has the right to a lawyer and a fair trial regardless of the charges.

People make mistakes, and people can change if given the opportunity. Millions of drug and alcohol abusers have received help and gone on to be a productive, positive part of society again. Sex offenders can also.

RUDOLPH H. COOLEY

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Investments have ties to terrorist countries

Why does the Public Employees Retirement System of Nevada invest in companies with ties to terrorist-sponsoring states? PERSN has over $2 billion invested in companies such as UBS AG, Siemens AG and Alcatel that have business operations in or with countries that sponsor terrorism. PERSN holds investments in 119 companies with ties to Iran, 44 with ties to Syria, 39 with ties to Libya and 38 with ties to Sudan.

At a time when our country is waging a deadly war against terrorism, I am deeply troubled that our state’s public dollars are going to companies whose business operations help underwrite countries that provide funding, technology and safe harbor to those who are trying to kill us. Indeed, companies that do business with these governments send an unmistakable message that their support for terrorism is not a concern as long as there are profits to be made. By investing in these companies, our state is condoning this type of irresponsible corporate behavior.

As patriotic Americans, we need to ensure that public monies support our war on terrorism, rather than go to companies whose disregard for state sponsorship of terrorism threatens the security of our country and its citizens.

PATRICK BRUNZLICK

Dayton

Refund should betied to registration

I thought the refund would best be handled at the time a vehicle is registered. To that end, I called the Governor’s Office and was told that should be discussed with the DMV. I was told by the DMV that the governor wanted to mail a check, not give a credit. Looks like for the governor’s ego, it cost the citizens of Nevada $1,400,000 (est.)

I do thank the governor for the rebate – hey, it was our money – but I’m dismayed that he chose this method of the refund.

Thomas Paine said: “We still find the greedy hand of government thrusting itself into every corner and crevice of industry and grasping at the spoil of the multitude. Invention is continually exercised to furnish new pretenses for revenue and taxation. It watches prosperity as its prey and permits none to escape without a tribute.”

So what does government do – at all levels – when it finds it has excess revenue? Well, they have all manner of places to spend the peoples’ money. Hey, it ain’t theirs – it is the people’s. So what should be at the top of their spending list – how about returning it from whom it has been confiscated?

TONY KLEIN

Minden

Person who shot dog is lowest form of life

This is to inform the person who shot my daughter’s dog out on Edmonds sometime during the last few days that I think you are the lowest form of life.

I’m sure that it took a big person to shoot a 40-pound dog.

There is a place waiting for you, and I hope it is full of the dogs you have shot.

JULIE WITHEY

Carson City