Silver Dollars & wooden nickels: A week of silver all around the city | NevadaAppeal.com

Silver Dollars & wooden nickels: A week of silver all around the city

The Nevada Appeal’s “Silver Dollar” and “Wooden Nickel” feature recognizes positive achievements from the capital region and, when warranted, points out others that missed the mark.

Silver Dollar: To the Boys & Girls Club, the Mentor Center of Western Nevada and local law enforcement who put on the Cops and Kids spaghetti dinner Tuesday at Casino Fandango. “A lot of these kids have had bad experiences with law enforcement,” Mentor Center director Ruth Gordon said. “A lot of law enforcement haven’t necessarily had good experiences with kids. This is a chance to sit down and get to know each other as people.”

Silver Dollar: To the Nevada Air Guard airmen who participated in the National Guard’s assistance of Haiti last week, completing two supply transportation missions. The C-130 departed Reno on Feb. 12 and traveled to Port-au-Prince on Tuesday and Thursday. During its supply transportation missions, the plane and its crew delivered more than 10 tons of goods and it shuttled more than 200 individuals from Haiti to the United States.

Silver Dollar: To the Northern Nevada Development Authority and its team of business ambassadors who traveled to Anaheim last week to promote the Silver State to medical device manufacturers. And another to Nevada Business Connections, for making a push in Oregon, promoting our tax climate and other selling points. Let’s hope we see the fruits of those labors soon, with new job-creating businesses looking to relocate to Northern Nevada.

Silver Dollar: Just a little one – let’s call it a silver dime – to Tiger Woods. Now, wait, before you protest, hear us out. How many times have we heard famous people make public apologies saying, “I’m sorry if I offended …” never actually copping to the misdeed? There’s even a whole page devoted to wormy mea culpas on Wikipedia, called the “Non-apology apology.” To his credit, Tiger manned up, offering unqualified apologies all around, taking full credit for his sleaziness. For someone whose private life was shown to hold little dignity, it was a dignified apology.