Thanks for offering to represent us | NevadaAppeal.com

Thanks for offering to represent us

Nevada Appeal Editorial Board

As the election campaign enters the home stretch, it’s time to thank candidates for representing the rest of us and volunteering their services in positions that offer far more work than reward.

This is especially true of local offices. Farther up the ladder, in statewide or federal contests, there may be candidates who revel in the recognition and authority that come with being an elected official.

But there’s not much glory in serving on a local school board, a county commission or board of supervisors. And even less monetary compensation.

Mainly it’s long meetings, complicated issues and decisions that are just as likely to displease one neighbor as they are to satisfy another.

Why do they do it?

Invariably, as we talk to candidates for local office, they say they feel an obligation to return something to the community.

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While there are many ways to volunteer and get involved in a place like Carson City (and thousands do), it takes extra gumption to put yourself on the line by asking friends and strangers alike to give you their vote.

We think of people like Rebecca Beisenstein, Kim Cohen and Debby Dailey, all running for local office for the first time, who could have sat back and let somebody else do it.

We think of people like Ray Masayko and Marv Teixeira who each fulfilled two four-year commitments to the office of mayor and are willing to do it again. And John McKenna, who’s been going to school board meetings for a dozen years and still wants to go to more.

In Carson City this election, there were relatively few candidates. A city supervisor seat and a school board seat went uncontested. We think it’s a sign people aren’t generally unhappy with the direction of local government, but it’s also an indication of the amount of work required for these posts.

All the candidates deserve a handshake, pat on the back and attentive ear to their reasons for running. It’s a tough job, and thank goodness somebody is willing to do it.