The Popcorn Stand: A ‘Marvel-ous’ Record | NevadaAppeal.com

The Popcorn Stand: A ‘Marvel-ous’ Record

We all watch our favorite movies over and over again and no matter how many times we watch it we always seem to catch something new we’ve never noticed before.
Well, a Wisconsin man has taken that to the extreme.
I continue to cover my fascination with those who are determined to set weird world records by writing about Steve Ruppel, who says he’s set a Guinness World Record by watching Captain Marvel 116 times in the theaters. It’s also apparently his fifth Guinness World Record.
I will say Ruppel has seen the latest Captain Marvel movie a 116 times more than I’ve seen — or likely will ever see.
Of course Ruppel rose to the challenge, saying he spent 12,268 minutes watching the movie when he discovered a Guinness World Record was at stake. Oh no. Now I’ve got that stupid song from “Rent” in my head.
And of course Ruppel had a perfectly logical reason for breaking the record. “I thought it was the most insane thing ever, I thought it was impossible. I wasn’t even sure why it was even a record, but I thought after a while ‘I should probably do that,’” Ruppel said.
I have no idea how Ruppel found this out, but apparently somebody had watched the same move 104 times, so Ruppel decided to watch Captain Marvel 116 times to be on the safe side.
And of course, Ruppel needs to have at least two witnesses verifying he watched the movie 116 times. You know like a hole-in-one. But wouldn’t that mean the witnesses set the record too?
To his credit, Ruppel is a believer that records are made to be broken, so if someone else decides to go after his record, he’s not going to try to re-break it.
Among Ruppel’s other records is running a half marathon while wearing the most shirts and the fastest time to drink 1 liter of gravy, 1 minute, 12.5 seconds. A true Renaissance Man.
And yes, Ruppel said watching Captain Marvel so many times gave him the chance to see details other Captain Marvel fans may have missed.
I guess that’s what records are made for.
— Charles Whisnand