The Popcorn Stand: Guess what day it is? It’s animals on the loose day | NevadaAppeal.com

The Popcorn Stand: Guess what day it is? It’s animals on the loose day

In keeping with my Wednesday tradition of writing about strange animals on the loose, on this Wednesday as I write this Popcorn Stand, I'm writing about a wandering donkey and wandering emus. A two-for-one.

Last week I wrote about a wayward camel which reminded me of that hilarious GEICO commercial in which a camel was so happy because it was hump day, Wednesday.

Now I get to write about how Maryland State Police had to call for backup to round up a loose donkey. This story too reminded me of when I watched early episodes of "The Waltons" and seeing John Boy using a mule as his mode of transportation.

Alas, state police, animal control and bystanders were able to calm down the wayward donkey. A truck driver stopped and offered the donkey some apple slices which allowed authorities to safely capture the animal. The 2-year-old miniature donkey named Pedro was returned to his home.

I've also written about how I enjoy wild horses roaming in my neighborhood and would love it if a camel made it into my neighborhood. I would really love it if an emu made it into my neighborhood.

That's what happened recently when an emu, who evidently thought it was in trouble with Florida law, escaped a Florida farm across the state border to Georgia where it wandered in residential neighborhoods.

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The emu made itself at home, wandering the neighborhood for three to four days before it was captured.

But there's more. Apparently there's an epidemic of wandering emus as another emu was on the loose in Alabama. It managed to stay on the lam for 12 days before being captured.

It's not surprising emus can go that long without being captured since they can reach speeds up to 30 mph. Maybe Keanu Reeves can ride an emu in the Speed 3 movie he's rumored to possibly be making. Of course my choice would be Nicolas Cage.

We'll leave the donkeys and mules to Richard Thomas.

Good night, John Boy.

— Charles Whisnand