The war on Christmas revisited again | NevadaAppeal.com

The war on Christmas revisited again

The Christmas season is upon us. No holiday season for me, just Christmas. There are only a few shopping days left until Santa arrives. Retailers are trying to make the most of these days, using every ploy they can think of to lure you into their establishment. There are always myriad parties to attend as well as lists of cards to mail out and food to prepare. People are sometimes harried and pressured, but for the most part seem to be in the spirit of the Christmas season.

Each year the assaults on Christmas increase. This year is no exception. All you need to do is read something besides the mainstream media, not only blithely ignores the assault, but sometimes seemingly embraces it.

The examples are numerous. Public schools still persist in banning anything about Christmas that even hints at the true reason for Christmas. For example, some schools have cancelled parties, plays or programs. Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" because of the words "God bless us, everyone" quoted from the book.

In a completely whacked out interpretation, writer Brian Moylan of Vulture recently stated that "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" is a parable of gay acceptance. A liberal professor says that "Jingle Bells" is a deeply racist song. Do the pathetic attempts by liberals for relevance have no boundaries?

I could go on and on with examples, but space is limited. Suffice it to say that the assaults on Christianity of all forms is continually under assault from the left. The Christmas season is especially prone to attacks because it represents the birth of Christ, which in leftist minds is an anathema to them.

Christians celebrate Christmas. Jews celebrate Hanukkah. Other religions celebrated events in their own religions, and atheists and agnostics celebrate, well, whatever they celebrate. Christmas is a decidedly Christian holiday in a decidedly Christian nation. For years there was an acceptance that each religion could practice its own beliefs, including events like Christmas, without interference from others. That for the last few years is being slowly eroded.

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I will be the first to admit that Christmas has become over-commercialized. I can remember when Christmas shopping didn't really begin until about a week after Thanksgiving. Then came Black Friday, which to me is nothing more than an organized mob. Now we have Black Thursday night. Oh, and don't forget Cyber Monday.

Christmas displays are going up in some stores earlier and earlier. Some started right after Halloween. Soon Thanksgiving may be nothing more than another day off to shop. Somewhere along the way some of the true meaning of Christmas has been lost. Fortunately, the generosity of the holiday is still around for programs such as the Wishing Tree, Toys for Tots, and others. Let's hope we never lose that.

There are bright spots. Some local and state governments are fighting back. Some have eschewed holiday trees for Christmas trees. Nativity scenes are becoming more, not less, common in towns, even if private land is necessary for their display.

I am tired of watching the rights of those in the majority being kicked to the curb by a vocal minority. Too often I see one or a handful of malcontents infringe on the rights of peaceful enjoyment of hundreds or even thousands, all in the name of "equality" and usually funded by my tax dollars.

Here is a news flash. There is no right of "equality." That is a communist concept. We have a right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. That means the ability to practice our religious beliefs, or lack thereof, without fear of repercussion. That means that I should not be called a bigot or other name if I profess to accept Christianity or participate in Christmas traditions.

After all, no one seems to object to Ramadan, the month-long Muslim holiday to commemorate the first revelation of the Quran to Muhammad. How is that more or less acceptable than celebrating Christ for two days, Christmas and Easter? Or lighting a Menorah during Hanukkah?

Liberals have been able to get great mileage out of being offended at the most obscure of supposed transgressions by others in order to get their way. Maybe, however, the recent election is a sign that the political correctness crowd is losing its sway. We can hope.

If you don't like Christmas, don't participate. I don't go to a mosque to celebrate Ramadan. Maybe I should be offended instead. On that note, Merry Christmas!

Tom Riggins' column appears every other Friday. He may be reached at news@lahontanvalleynews.com.