Past Pages for July 29-July 31 | NevadaAppeal.com
YOUR AD HERE »

Past Pages for July 29-July 31

By Sue Ballew

Wednesday

150 Years Ago

Flying horses:  Up on King street, opposite Cavanaugh’s Bakery are a cavalcade of flying horses swinging around the circle to the breathless strains of a hand organ.  The little folks in town are attracted there, and for the price of a ride–twelve and one-half cents, many a youthful cavalier with lance can ride in the charmed circle and jab with their stubby lances at some iron rings, which are the prizes of lancership and gallant riding.  

140 Years Ago

A foolhardy act:  A number of ladies and gentleman were visiting Glenbrook and went to the Summit to the head of the large flume.  One of their party dared taking a trip down the flume.  A wager was made and accept by Witcher Harlow and Miss Belle Graham of San Francisco.  They jumped on a raft of wood and floated down the flume for a distance of a mile or more.  A sudden lurch caused them to lose their equilibrium, and they were thrown face first into the wildly tossed wood.  A half mile down they were fished out by flume watchmen—badly bruised and cut up, but otherwise uninjured.

130 Years Ago

Close shave:  Jake Thall who works in Green’s butcher shop found it so warm that he went into the refrigerator to cool off, sat down in a chair, fell asleep and did not wake up for some time.  When he came to, he was stiff all over and could not bend his neck—a little longer would have given him pneumonia.

120 Years Ago

Ex-Governor Blasdel Dead:  The flag at the Capitol building was at half mast out of respect for ex-Governor Blasdel who died in Oakland.  He was the first man to sit in the gubernatorial chair of Nevada.

110 Years Ago

Death:  David A. Smaill, born in the Dominion of Canada, came to Carson City in 1868.  He went to work for Sam Longabaugh in an Empire blacksmith shop.  He leaves a wife and four daughters.  His funeral was largely attended by the friends of the pioneers and services conducted by Rev. H. H. McCreery of the Presbyterian Church.

100 Years Ago

Ponzi, master of finance:  Governor Coolidge ordered the attorney general to begin an immediate investigation into the business of Charles Ponzi, “bushel basket millionaire,” who in eight months claims to have made $24,000,000 dealing in International Postal reply coupons.   (United Press, Boston)

Thursday

150 Years Ago

Capitol:  The Masons are already laying a course of stone on the second story of the Capitol.

140 Years Ago

Fled to the Mountains:  The editor of the Appeal and his wife started for the Lake.  He took along with him vast quantities of fishing tackle, poles, landing nets, flies, shot guns and “Abe,” the office bull dog, under the wagon.  They’ll be gone for a week. 

130 Years Ago

All sorts:  A private detective has been employed by the sportsmen’s club of Storey, Washoe and Ormsby counties to nab the pot hunters.

120 Years Ago

24 to 0:  The young baseball sharps of this city tackled the Orphans’ Home baseball nine.  The “Home” boys taught the “Town” kids a severe lesson.  They fielded and batted like veterans and knocked the ball over the diamond.  The score stood 24 to 0 at the end of the ninth inning in favor of the Orphans.

110 Years Ago

To the Lake:  Arthur Bordewich, pressman at the State Printing Office, has gone to Lake Tahoe for a couple of day’s recreation.

100 Years Ago

Sugar business:  F. E. Stephenson, a former employee of the Western Pacific yards as switchman, was charged with stealing ten sacks of sugar from a box car in the Elko yards.  They were selling at $25 to $30 per sack normally but he was selling them to merchants at $20 per sack.  He is now in jail awaiting a preliminary hearing.  (Elko Free Press)

Friday

150 Years Ago

Peeping Tom:  A fellow at Hamilton goes about at night peeping into the windows of lady’s bedrooms.  The News says one brave woman took a shot at him.  If he keeps on, he is likely to get a bullet through his hide.

140 Years Ago

New style of Dentistry:  A Genoa man called at the office of a dentist in Carson and asked to have a tooth extracted. He was placed in a cane bottomed operating chair, and the dentist stuck the forceps into the patient’s mouth.  Then the patient closed his mouth, preventing the dentist from accomplishing his object.  After several tries, the dentist became disgusted with his timid patient, and stationed as assistant, with a long darning needle in his hand at the back of the chair.  The assistant ran his needle through the cane seat into a fleshy part of the sufferer’s anatomy, and he yelled loudly.  At the same time the tooth was yanked out.  “My heavens, doctor!”  I had no idea the root of the tooth ran down so low.”

130 Years Ago

Marriage:  When the Justice of the Peace Gass of San Jose marries a couple, he exacts a kiss from the lips of the bride.  This is a hint for Justice Young of ours. (Journal)

Our Justice of the Peace needs no hint, he collects his toll every time, and so do most preachers.  (Morning Appeal)

120 Years Ago

All sorts:  Water is growing pretty scarce at the Capitol, and it keeps the gardener hustling to keep the grass green.

The Band boys announce that there will be no more concerts as the kids make more noise than the band. 

110 Years Ago

Camping:  John Wilson and Thurman Roberts (of Foreman-Roberts House) spent several days at Bijou.  They report having had the time of their lives in the tall timber.

100 Years Ago

Carson City Theater:  The feature picture is, “Love’s Prisoner,” with Olive Thomas in the lead, giving the beautiful star ample opportunity to display her talent in a comedy drama.  Pathe preview will provide pictures in natural colors, also in a movagraph slow-motion picture which slows up lightning fast movements—A Mutt and Jeff cartoon will be shown.

Sue Ballew is the daughter of Bill Dolan, who wrote this column for the Nevada Appeal from 1947 until his death in 2006.