Selected information on 2007 Nevada bird hunting seasons | NevadaAppeal.com

Selected information on 2007 Nevada bird hunting seasons

Don Quilici

The day after tomorrow is Sept. 1 and do you want to guess what that means?

Well, if you own or can borrow a shotgun, Sept. 1 means it is the start of bird hunting in Nevada.

So, if you’re interested, here is some selected information:

Blue and Ruffed Grouse:

The 2007 Nevada Blue Grouse and Ruffed Grouse hunting season opens Sept. 1, statewide.

There is a daily limit of 3 and a possession limit of 6.

This season closes on Nov. 30.

Hours are sunrise to sunset.

Open to Non-Residents.

Special Note No. 1: The head or one fully feathered wing must be attached to all blue and ruffed grouse until the carcass reaches the possessor’s residence or a commercial facility for its preservation.

Special Note. No. 2: Persons harvesting blue grouse are requested to deposit one wing from each bird harvested at any Nevada Department of Wildlife office, check station, or with Department employees who contact you in the field.

Special Note No. 3: Persons harvesting ruffed grouse in Humboldt County are requested to report the harvest to the Department of Wildlife’s Winnemucca sub-office at 815 East Fourth St., in Winnemucca.

For information, call the Nevada Department of Wildlife in Winnemucca at (775) 623-6565.

American Crow:

The 2007-2008 Nevada American Crow fall hunting season will open on Sept. 1, statewide.

There is a daily limit of 10.

This season closes on Nov. 17.

The spring season will run March 1 to Apr. 15, 2008.

Hours are sunrise to sunset.

Open to Non-Residents.

Shotguns only.

All crows must be retrieved and removed from the field.

Season is closed on Ravens.

Mourning/White Wing Dove:

The 2007 Nevada Mourning and White-Winged Dove hunting season will open on Sept. 1, statewide.

There is a daily limit of 10 and a possession limit of 20.

This season closes on Sept. 30.

Hunting hours are one half hour before sunrise to sunset daily.

Open to Non-Residents.

Special Note No. 1: White-wing dove season is closed in all Nevada counties except Clark and Nye Counties.

Special Note No. 2: Hunters are reminded that because the dove is a migratory bird and comes under federal regulations, shotguns must be plugged to limit the overall shotgun capacity to three shells.

Special Note No. 3: Any person 12 years or older who hunts dove will need to obtain a Harvest Information Program validation number to be able to hunt migratory bird species. They can do so by calling (866) 703-4605 or by going to website http://www.ndowlicensing.com.

Snowcock (Himalayan Snow partridge):

The 2007 Nevada Snowcock (Himalayan Snow partridge) hunting season will open on Sept. 1, only in Elko County in Management Units 101, 102, and 103, and that portion of White Pine County in Unit 103.

There is a daily and season limit of two birds.

This season closes on Nov. 30.

Hours are sunrise to sunset.

Open to Non-Residents.

Persons planning to hunt snowcocks are asked to contact either sespinosa@ndow.org or dcarter@ndow.org or call (775) 688-1529 to request a snowcock hunting free-use permit.

For information, call the Nevada Department of Wildlife in Elko at (775) 777-2300.

MISCELLANEOUS:

1. Any person 12 years or older who plans to hunt any kind of migratory game bird, including ducks, geese, swans, rails, coot, doves, snipe, or gallinules in Nevada this year, is required annually to obtain a Harvest Information Program (HIP) validation number and write it on their hunting license before entering the field.

They can do so by calling (866) 703-4605 or by going to the Internet at http://www.ndowlicensing.com.

2. If you hunt Hungarian and chukar partridge, quail, pheasant, snowcock and sage, blue and ruffed grouse, you will need the Nevada Upland Game Stamp.

THERE YOU HAVE IT:

Some selected bird hunting information for your use.

And, most importantly, be sure that you pick up a copy of the 2007 seasons and regulations and carry them with you in the field or go to website http://www.ndow.org to check on them.

• Bet Your Favorite Pigeon

Bet your favorite pigeon that he can’t tell you where Nevada’s very first snowcocks (AKA Himalayan Snow partridge) originally came from.

If he grins and says, “Native to central Asia, the Snowcock was first introduced into Nevada way back in 1963, when the Nevada Department of wildlife (NDOW) released 19 birds from Pakistan into the Ruby Mountains,” he wins.

• Don Quilici is the Outdoors editor for the Nevada Appeal.