Some selected information on 2005 Nevada bird hunting seasons | NevadaAppeal.com

Some selected information on 2005 Nevada bird hunting seasons

Don Quilici

Today is Sept. 1 and it is also that time of the year, again, that if your “man of the house,” “significant other,” “main squeeze,” or good friend has been recently acting a little withdrawn or reserved, relax.

There’s nothing wrong. He is perfectly OK. It’s just that time of the year. It’s bird hunting time.

So, if someone you know falls into that category, here is some bird hunting info for them:

Blue/Ruffed Grouse:

The 2005 hunting season will open on Sept. 3 in Carson City, Douglas, Elko, Esmeralda, Eureka, Humboldt, Lander, Lincoln, Lyon, Nye, Washoe and White Pine Counties. It is closed in Churchill, Clark, Mineral, Pershing and Storey Counties.

There is a daily limit of 2 and a possession limit of 4.

This season closes Nov. 30.

Hours are sunrise to sunset.

Open to non-residents.

Note No. 1: The head or one fully feathered wing must be attached to all blue and ruffed grouse until the carcass reaches either the possessor’s residence or a commercial facility (taxidermy) for its preservation.

Note No. 2: Persons harvesting ruffed grouse in Humboldt County are requested to report the harvest to the Department of Wildlife (NDOW) sub-office at 815 East Fourth St., Winnemucca, NV 89445.

For information, call that NDOW office at (775) 623-6565.

American Crow:

The 2005 Fall Season will open, statewide, on Sept. 1.

Daily bag limit of 10.

Fall Season closes Nov. 17.

Season closed on all Ravens.

Crow/Raven identification:

The crow (17.5 inches) is noticeably smaller than a raven (24 inches). Crows often flock, while ravens are more solitary birds. The crow’s bill is much smaller than the raven, and its tail is square.

The Raven’s heavy bill, shaggy throat feathers and wedge-shaped tail also set it apart from the common crow.

Open to non-residents.

For information, call NDOW in Reno at 688-1500.

Mourning/White Wing Dove:

The 2005 hunting season will open, statewide, on Sept. 1.

There is a limit of 10 Doves daily and 20 in possession.

This season closes Sept. 30.

Shooting hours are one half hour before sunrise to sunset.

Open to non-residents.

Note No. 1: White-wing dove season is closed in all counties except Clark and Nye.

Note. No. 2: Hunters are reminded that because the dove is a migratory bird and comes under federal regulations, shotguns must be plugged to limit the overall shotgun capacity to three shells.

Note No. 3: All hunters, 12 years and older, are also reminded that they will need to obtain a Harvest Information Program (HIP) validation number by either calling 866-703-4605 or going to website http://www.ndowlicensing.com. to be able to hunt migratory bird species.

That validation number is free.

For information, call NDOW in Reno at 688-1500.

Snowcock (Himalayan Snow partridge):

The 2005 hunting season will open on Sept. 3.

Open in Elko County’s Management Units 101, 102, and 103, and that portion of White Pine County in Unit 103.

It is closed in all other counties and in alll other areas in Elko and White Pine.

Daily/season limit: two birds.

This season closes Nov. 30.

Hours are sunrise to sunset.

Open to non-residents.

Special Note: Persons planning to hunt snowcocks are requested to obtain a snowcock hunting, free-use-permit, which is in PDF format at Internet website http://www.ndow.org or from the Department of Wildlife Eastern Region Office, at 60 Youth Center Road in Elko.

Permits can be E-mailed to the hunter from the Elko office.

For information, call the NDOW regional office in Elko at (775) 777-2300.

THERE YOU HAVE IT:

Some selected hunting information that your bird hunter might need or want to know.

Most importantly, be sure he picks up a copy of the 2005 seasons and regulations and carries it in the field, or he goes to the NDOW Internet website (www.ndow.org) to check on those regulations.

• Bet Your Favorite Pigeon

Bet your favorite pigeon that he can’t tell you where Nevada’s snowcocks (AKA Himalayan Snow Partridge) originally came from.

If he grins and says, “They were introduced into Nevada many, many years ago, from the Himalayan Mountains area of Asia,” he wins this bet.