Upland game hunting seasons to open on Saturday, Oct. 14 | NevadaAppeal.com

Upland game hunting seasons to open on Saturday, Oct. 14

Don Quilici

The 2006-2007 Nevada hunting seasons for Chukar, Hungarian Partridge, four species of quail (California, Gambel’s, Scaled and Mountain) and three species of rabbit (Cottontail, Pygmy and White-Tailed Jackrabbit) will open on Saturday, Oct. 14.

Those seasons are as follows:

Chukar Partridge:

Statewide. Daily bag limit of 6 and a possession limit of 18. This season will close on Jan. 31. Open to Non-Residents.

The shooting hours are sunrise to sunset daily.

Note: For those who are unfamiliar with something called a Chukar, it is a very popular Nevada upland game bird.

A Chukar is physically larger than a quail and smaller than a pheasant. It has unique markings around its eyes that make it look like it is wearing a bandit’s mask, and it also has dark bar markings on its chest feathers.

This exotic game bird was successfully introduced into Nevada many years ago from its native areas in the Himalayan Mountains of Asia. Since then, it has spread throughout Nevada.

It is a very wily bird, equally adapt at either running or flying away from you.

Chukar hunting has also produced some very bad language from countless, frustrated hunters who have unsuccessfully chased it up and down the steep, rocky ridges in Nevada’s backcountry. Heck, if you don’t think so, just ask Norm Budden.

Hungarian Partridge:

Statewide. Daily bag limit of 6 and a possession limit of 18. This season will close on Jan. 31. Open to Non-Residents.

The shooting hours are sunrise to sunset daily.

Note: The bulk of the Hungarian Partridge populations are in Northeastern Nevada.

California, Gambel’s, Scaled and Mountain Quail:

Statewide. Daily limit of 10 and a possession limit of 20. This season will close on Jan. 31. Open to Non-Residents.

The shooting hours are sunrise to sunset daily.

Note: Mountain Quail: There is a daily limit of 2 and a possession limit of 4.

Rabbit (Cottontail, Pygmy and White-Tailed Jackrabbit):

Statewide. Daily bag limit of 10 and a possession limit of 20. This season will close on Feb. 28. Open to Non-Residents.

The shooting hours are sunrise to sunset daily.

Note: You do not need an upland game bird stamp to hunt rabbits in Nevada.

Upland Game Stamp:

If you hunt Chukar Partridge, Hungarian Partridge, Quail, Pheasant, Snowcock and Sage, Blue and Ruffed Grouse, you will need an Upland Game Bird Stamp. This applies to both residents and nonresidents with an annual hunting license or a short term permit to hunt.

If you hunt dove, crow, wild turkey or waterfowl, you are NOT required to have Nevada’s Upland Game Bird Stamp.

Upland Game Bird Stamps are also not required when hunting migratory game birds, such as doves (dove is a migratory game bird, not an upland game bird) ducks, geese and other waterfowl.

Note: In 2006, a Upland Game Stamp costs $10.

Finally:

Here is a special tip to first-time, “Wanna-Be” Chukar hunters: Never, never, never ask another Chukar hunter where he gets his birds.

If you do, he will give you a vague answer such as, “North of Winnemucca or north of Battle Mountain or north of Elko.”

They are very protective of their secret hunting locations. Your best bet is to get invited on his Chukar hunt, so can he take you to that secret location.

If you do get invited, good luck on your hunt and remember who gave you this tip!

Most importantly, remem ber that I love to eat Chukar.

For information:

Call the Nevada Department of Wildlife at 688-1500 during regular business hours.

• Bet Your Favorite Pigeon

Bet your favorite pigeon that he can’t tell you if I hunt Chukar.

If he grins and says, “Don does not hunt Chukar. He learned long ago, not to hunt something that can fly, run and outsmart him.

That combination is way too difficult to beat even for Don Q.

Being sneaky, he just waits for a friend who hunts Chukar to be successful and to invite him over to a Chukar dinner.

That way, he gets a gourmet meal and there is a lot less hiking up and down steep ridges, a lot less wear and tear on his poor old body, a lot less sweating and a lot less nasty swearing,” he could be one of my close friends and a Chukar hunter, who has provided me with birds in the past.

• Don Quilici is the Outdoors editor for the Nevada Appeal.