Victorian homes open doors to Christmas yule | NevadaAppeal.com

Victorian homes open doors to Christmas yule

staff reports

Many of Carson City’s Victorian homes, with Christmas decorations adorning their interiors, will be open to the public this weekend.

The Nevada Landmarks Society annual Victorian Christmas tour will be from 1 to 6 p.m. Sunday.

Besides viewing the elegant architecture and decor, society docents will provide the history behind each structure on the tour.

The stories behind the buildings, which date to the mid or late 1800s, paint an intriguing picture of what life was like in Carson City before the turn of the century.

Tickets are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors/students. Children ages 5 through 12 are $3. The tour benefits the Nevada Landmarks Society, a group dedicated to preserving Nevada history.

Homes and businesses featured on the self-guided tour include:

— First Presbyterian Church at 100 N. Nevada St. The church was founded in 1861 in part by Samuel and Orion Clemens and is the oldest continuously operating church in Nevada. It is open from 3 to 6 p.m., refreshments served.

— St. Charles Hotel, 310 S. Carson St. Constructed in 1862, it was one of the most elegant hotels in the state. It became the main stage stop in Carson City.

It is one of the oldest remaining commercial buildings in town and is actually a combination of two hotels, the old St. Charles and the Muller hotels. The building has been known as the Briggs House, Golden West Hotel, Traveler’s Hotel and finally, the Pony Express. It is open 3 to 6 p.m. and features “Washoe Seeress,” Eilley Orrum Bowers from Bowers Mansion.

— J.D. Roberts House, 1217 N. Carson St. A park and house owned by Carson City, it was originally built in Washoe City near Washoe Lake in 1859 and moved to its present site in 1873. Most noteworthy is the outstanding gable trim.

— Adams House, 990 N. Minnesota St., is in the process of renovation and was recently acquired by Carson-Tahoe Hospital.

— Virginia & Truckee Railroad Depot, 729 N. Carson St. Built in 1872, the large, wood frame passenger depot had H.M. Yerington’s private office and reception room and was the arrival point to Carson City for presidents Grant, Hayes and Roosevelt.

— First United Methodist Church, corner of Division and Musser streets. It was built in 1867 of sandstone quarried at the Nevada State Prison. The ground was paid for with $25 and a pair of boots. It is one of the oldest continuous operating churches in Carson City. It is open from 3 to 6 p.m., refreshments served.

— Krebs-Peterson Home, 500 N. Mountain St. The home was built in 1914 by Ernest T. Krebs Sr., a physician and surgeon. It was later purchased by former State Controller Edward Peterson, and is now owned by Bob McFadden. The symmetrical composition is reflected by two porch wings and two oval stained windows flanking the entrance. A John Wayne movie, “The Shootist,” was filmed in part here.

— Elliott-Chartz House, 412 N. Nevada St., was built in 1876, featuring elaborately roofed bays and matching entry.

— Ormsby-Rosser House, 304 S. Minnesota St., was built in the winter of 1862-63 by Margaret Ormsby, widow of Nevada pioneer Major William M. Ormsby, who had been killed in the Pyramid Lake War of 1860. The Christmas spirits of Mrs. Ormsby and Miss Clapp will be on hand to greet visitors.

— Robinson House, 406 N. Mountain St., was built in 1873 by Marshall Robinson, one of the founders of the Carson Daily Appeal. In 1949, the movie “Chicken Every Sunday” was filmed at the Robinson House. A portrayal of Nellie Mighels Davis will be at the Robinson House to greet visitors.

Other surprise visitors will be on the tour to enhance the experience of the Victorian Christmas Home Tour.

Cost of the tour includes a map of the homes, background information and refreshments along the way. Tickets are available at the Carson City Chamber of Commerce; Country Castle, 314 S. Carson St.; and Kennedy’s Book Store. They will also be sold at the Roberts House Museum from noon-2 p.m. on the day of the event.