STRENGTH for the slopes | NevadaAppeal.com

STRENGTH for the slopes

Anthony Gentile
agentile@tahoedailytribune.com
A skier cuts through the trees at Heavenly Mountain Resort. With the winter season nearing, and a pre-season exercise routine can help ensure a successful return to the mountain.
Courtesy Matt Gibson / Tahoe South |

As ski and snowboard season nears, winter sports enthusiasts can’t wait to get back on the mountain. But an injury can quickly derail that enthusiasm.

A successful return to the slopes starts with proper preparation and conditioning. While some injuries can’t be avoided, an exercise routine leading up to the first time on the mountain can help ease the transition to getting back on skis or a snowboard.

“It’s getting in shape to play a sport, not playing a sport to get in shape,” said Jeremy Vandehurst, an athletic trainer with Barton Health. “That’s a huge component of any activity.”

In the weeks leading up to opening day, an every-other-day routine that focuses on core, hip, quad and glute strength — muscles typically engaged while skiing or snowboarding — is a good place to start. Along with that, exercises should ideally last 30 to 120 seconds — the length of a typical run.

With those ideas in mind, Vandehurst recommends four exercises to prepare for the upcoming season. Wall sits, single-leg lunges, bridges and planks are a good foundation for a winter sports-oriented workout routine — and can be done differently as strength increases.

“There’s so many different variations we can do with these exercises,” Vandehurst said. “It gives a person that’s just starting out and somebody that is already pretty fit different options.”

WALL SITS

This exercise synonymous with basketball practice activates the core, hamstrings and quads — and will quickly be felt. Put your back flat against the wall and sit on an imaginary chair, starting with a 75-degree angle for 30 seconds — then go up time and move closer to a 90-degree angle as strength increases.

Start with 30 seconds and increase time as needed

SINGLE-LEG LUNGES

Vandehurst said single-leg exercises are pivotal for snowboarders, who typically don’t have a balance between both legs while on the board. Lunges are a starting point for single-leg exercises.

“A lot of times snowboarders rely on that one back leg and they don’t switch,” Vandehurst said. “A program that incorporates both legs individually is important.”

Stretch one leg forward while bending the knee of the back leg to perform this exercise, which is great for increasing quad and glute strength. Drive your weight through the heel of the front foot, and don’t put your knee past your toe while moving forward — add weight as strength increases or a twist at the end to engage the core.

Start with three sets of 10 total lunges

BRIDGE

A common issue that leads to knee injuries on and off the mountain is disproportionate strength between quads and hamstrings. Performing the bridge exercise is one way to build hamstring strength. While laying down flat on the ground, bend your knees and lift your hips in the air — pause at the top and slowly lower back down. This exercise can also be performed with weight.

Start with three sets of 10

PLANKING

Not to be confused with the past Internet phenomenon of laying flat in random areas, this exercise hits the core to prepare it for the upcoming twists and turns on the mountain. Many variations exist for this exercise, with the basic being to rest on your forearms and elbows while keeping everything else off the ground — if that’s too tough, start on your knees.

Start with 15 seconds, and increase time as needed

BARTON HEALTH WELLNESS LECTURE SERIES

Pre-season conditioning will be one of the topics at the latest lecture in Barton Health’s Wellness Lecture Series on Tuesday, Nov. 1. The lecture, entitled “Maximizing On Hill Performance” will be held from 6-7 p.m. inside the Lake Tahoe Community College Board Room.

“There’s a risk involved when you do sport, but the idea is to do the little things to get ready for it,” Vandehurst said.

The free lecture will cover injury prevention, concussion recognition and care, pre-season conditioning, strength training to maximize the season and the importance of wellness and fitness. It will include demonstrations and presentations from Vandehurst and fellow athletic trainer Jeff Brown, along with Dr. Terrence Orr, performance coach Nick Ward and Dr. Beachy Orr, who has a PhD in anatomy.

“There are lots of little tips we will go through and talk about in regards to getting the most out of the season,” Vandehurst said.

Lake Tahoe Community College is located at 1 College Dr. in South Lake Tahoe. For more information on Barton’s lecture series, visit http://www.bartonhealth.org/lecture.