Carson City’s International Film Weekend in full force

Independent filmmaker Kari Barber introduces her film 'Baking Alaska' on Thursday at Western Nevada College. Roughly 50 people were in attendance.

Independent filmmaker Kari Barber introduces her film 'Baking Alaska' on Thursday at Western Nevada College. Roughly 50 people were in attendance.

The second annual International Film Weekend kicked off Thursday.

After last year’s successful first edition, organizers will offer a lineup that will “celebrate cultural diversity through films,” in the words of Linda Bellegray, member of the organization. “Obaba,” directed by Navarrese filmmaker Montxo Armendariz, will be shown on Saturday.

It’s a modest festival with the high goal of helping “our community to know more about other cultures,” Bellegray said. That’s why, together with the films, attendants to the Carson City’s International Film Weekend also will enjoy with food, music, and pictures from the countries the films are from, and a pre- and a post-movie discussion.

Bellegray said acclaimed Basque writer Bernardo Atxaga, author of the novel “Obabakoak,” on which Armendariz’s film was based, was invited to attend the festival.

“We talked to him but he declined regretfully because it was too far for him to travel. And we understood. But he was very grateful for including his film in the festival,” Bellegray said.

“Boy,” a 2010 film set on the east coast of the country, in the year 1984, kicked off the festival Thursday afternoon. The film tells the story of a rendezvous between an 11-year-old kid and his father. The film was awarded in Berlin, Germany, and nominated in Sundance.

Today will be the day of “Himalaya,” the first Nepalese movie ever to be nominated for the Academy Awards. Released in 1999, the flick shows the life of the people of the region of Dolpa, at an altitude of five thousand meters.

And on Saturday, the festival will come to an end with “Obaba.” But beforehand, pintxos made by chef Pete Coscarart, owner in Carson City of Villa Basque Deli, and wine will be offered to the public.

All the films will start at 7 p.m., at the Carson City Community Center, 851 East William St.

This year, the International Film Weekend also includes a section with “independently made films,” that are scheduled for viewing on afternoons, at the Western Nevada College’s Marlette Hall. These films will start at 3 p.m.

Kari Barber’s “Baking Alaska” and Gabriel Lopez-Shaw’s “Great Basin pipemakers” were shown Thursday. Today, Director Mary Works’ “Rocking at the Red Dog,” an hour and a half documentary about psychedelic rock at the Virginia City saloon, will be shown.

All events are free. For more information, visit http://internationalfilmweekendcarsoncity.com/.

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