Hairy Pawter investigates Dogwarts

Sheba is a beautiful 12-year-old brown tabby who came to CAPS because she was afraid of the family dog she was living with. She is a bit shy but loves to visit and to be held. Sheba is looking for a calm home with folks who will love her. Come out and meet her; she would love to curl up in your lap.

Sheba is a beautiful 12-year-old brown tabby who came to CAPS because she was afraid of the family dog she was living with. She is a bit shy but loves to visit and to be held. Sheba is looking for a calm home with folks who will love her. Come out and meet her; she would love to curl up in your lap.

Watson here, a.k.a. Hairy, just wanted to let you know I’m seriously looking into dog warts. Not the Dogwarts School of Magic but warts on dogs. OK, my mom found a bump on my neck when she was brushing me so it’s investigation time.

Dogs can develop bumps from infection or allergies that are benign. But not all bumps are harmless and can be skin tumors that are abnormal growths of skin cells. Luckily, most of the skin tumors in dogs are benign; however, early detection of malignancy is important for treatment.

There are three growths that are commonly confused with warts:

1. Sebaceous cysts are small round smooth pimple-like growths that are black, pink, white, or flesh colored. They are harmless.

2. Histiocytomas are benign but quick-growing tumors. These are commonly found in dogs under two years old. They are round or button shaped, and they seem to pop up overnight.

3. Mast cell tumors are growths to worry about! They are easily confused with other growths, because they vary in appearance. They develop quickly and may be itchy. Your dog’s life may depend on early detection.

Warts are caused by the papillomavirus, which is an opportunistic virus that shows up when a dog has a compromised immune system. All dogs are exposed to papillomavirus throughout their lifetimes, but the virus is only able to “latch on” when a dog’s immune system can’t fight it.

Warts are common in older dogs. Old dog warts look like small flesh-colored cauliflower heads that can be pink, black or, gray. Warts caused by the papillomavirus are just a symptom of the virus, and removing them doesn’t eliminate the virus from your dog’s system so the warts will likely grow back.

My investigation is complete. I think I have old dog warts, but to be sure, we’ll check with my veterinarian.

XOXO Watson aka Hairy

IN NEED OF

Items for the CAPS annual garage sale. Call 775-423-7500 to have us pick up items.

Bleach, hand sanitizer, Clorox wipes, and disinfectant.

Aluminum cans. If you have cans to pick up, give us a call (775-423-7500), and we will come get them. You can also drop them off at CAPS.

Folks who need their pets spayed/neutered, SNAPS details are below.

SHOUT OUT TO

The generous person who donated $1,000 to help with our expenses. A big pooch smooch to you!

All the folks who have brought out food and cleaning supplies. Paws applause to you!!

The folks who adopted Neeva to share their home. All tails are wagging for you!

COME SEE US

CAPS is open, by appointment only, for adoptions, SNAPS, and food pantry. We cannot accept volunteers until further notice. Call 775-423-7500.

DON’T FORGET

June Pet Holiday: Cat World Domination Day is June 24.

SNAPS is a program offered to Churchill County residents through CAPS that provides low-cost spay/neutering for cats and dogs. To qualify for SNAPS, you need to have one of the following: Medicaid, a child enrolled in NV Check Up Program, food stamps, 2019 tax return stating income is less than $30,000 or veterans disability card including a photo ID. Also required are a Churchill County ID and a co-pay. For information, call CAPS at 423-7500.

You can donate directly to CAPS on Facebook by just hitting the donate button. We need your support and we thank you for helping us.

CONTACT CAPS

CAPS’ mailing address is P.O. Box 5128, Fallon, NV 89407. CAPS’ phone number is 775-423-7500. CAPS’ email address is caps@cccomm.net. Please visit the CAPS website (www.capsnevada.com) and Facebook page (Churchill Animal Protection Society). Be sure to “Like” CAPS on Facebook because we are really likeable.

CAPS is open to the public on Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Kathleen Williams-Miller is a CAPS volunteer. Contact me, jkwmil@outlook.com.

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