Carson City Historical Society presents, "Lessons From The Cemetery," on March 18

Karen Dustman

Karen Dustman

The Carson City Historical Society will present its third lecture of 2021, "Lessons From The Cemetery," at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 18 on Zoom.
There's something fascinating about old cemeteries. Who were these long-forgotten people? What were their lives like? What were their stories? And what clues can we find on these historic headstones? Author Karen Dustman shares tales and discoveries from her books on Genoa and Fredericksburg Cemeteries, for a fascinating look at the past.
The lecture is free and open to the public. For information about attending, contact David Bugli at 775-883-4154 or send an email to Dcbugli@aol.com, and he will provide you with a meeting link (or a meeting ID with passcode).
Dustman is a multi-book author, and has penned hundreds of magazine articles on topics ranging from pet care to natural health. But her very favorite topic is local history.
Dustman's books include a history of Silver Mountain City, a three-volume set on Genoa Cemetery, and a walking tour guide to Fredericksburg Cemetery. She also publishes a free monthly e-newsletter featuring Sierra history and other fascinating tales. For information about Karen's publications, go to https://www.clairitage.com/about-clairitage-press.
Also, the second lecture for 2021 is now available on the Society's YouTube channel.
On Feb. 18, Garrett Barmore, curator of the W. M. Keck Earth Science and Mineral Engineering Museum at the University of Nevada, Reno, presented "The Cocktail and Alcohol Culture of Virginia City."
He discussed the history of several alcoholic beverages and how they related to daily life in Virginia City during the mining boom. Barmore demonstrated the making of these drinks and the histories behind them.
The lecture included three cocktail recipes and a bonus punch recipe, which can be downloaded at http://cchistorical.org/200218_Garrett_Barmore_recipes_v2.pdf.
The video of this lecture is now available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewPEwcNVr5E or through a link at CCHistorical.org.

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment