Jim Valentine: Spring in Northern Nevada

Jim Valentine on Real Estate

Jim Valentine on Real Estate

Spring is almost here and what does that bring? You’ve seen the calves bounding about the pastures since January, but soon there will be an abundance of babies everywhere. Lambs, colts, geese, etc., will be testing their wobbly legs, flapping their winglets, and learning their role in the wonderful natural environment of Northern Nevada.
Crops, too, will see a spring resurgence. Ranchers have been preparing diligently by burning their ditches, dragging their fields, and mending their fences. There’s been a bit of smoke and dust from their efforts but thank goodness state and county laws and ordinances protect the farmers from complaints from newcomers about the side effects of their farming. The irony is that the newbies want the farmers to keep the valleys green for their visual enjoyment, but often want to handicap them by restricting the traditional processes they use.
Remember why you moved here, to enjoy Northern Nevada and its way of life. If that is the case, don’t ask us to do what they did where you came from. If it was that good, you would still be living there. Since you are here, learn how to live here.
We don’t like to see litter on our rural roads, especially the liquor bottles that seem to multiply by our pasture fences these days. The land you are throwing your waste onto may be big, but it belongs to somebody. Would you like us to throw a liquor bottle on your lawn? That is what you are doing to a property owner along a roadway when you litter here.
Rural roads often have farm equipment moving slowly from field to field. Slow down and enjoy the moment. When you swing out past the double line and race to get around the moving implement, you might not see the neighbor rancher’s dog out “saying hi” to the passing swather. These are country roads with country speed limits for a reason, animals can escape and be on the road. If you happen to hit a horse or cow on the road, I assure you that you will lose that battle. Keep your speeding for faster roads, don’t try to make these faster.
The winds have been blowing all winter driving the leaves and tumbleweeds into the smallest crevasses everywhere. They are dry and combustible. Everyone will be working hard to get them raked or blown to a place where they can be bagged or burned.
Time to turn the sprinklers on and get some water to your parched landscaping. We’ve gone a long time without precipitation and your plants need it. It is still early, however, so be careful planting your vegetables. The local rule of thumb is wait until after Memorial Day to plant your tomatoes outside. We may not get weather, but planting tomatoes early is like washing your car – it will rain. In the tomatoes case it will freeze.
Keep your ditches clean so when we get some good thundershowers the water has a place to go. You might not think of your ditches as intently as the ranchers do, but you may have drainage across your property that needs to be tended to. Keep your culverts clear if your driveway has culverts. We’ve seen more than one major flood caused by someone not caring to their culverts resulting in a massive redirection of the water flow. Not pleasant for anybody. Do your part.
Spring is a special time that leads to the wonderful visual pleasures we see in our environment in Northern Nevada all summer and into fall. Things will go from brown to green, from still winter calm to full of life. Appreciate this transition and be ready for your summer recreation period as the ski resorts shut down and the lakes become more appealing.
We live here to enjoy every day for what it is. Four good seasons, mountain living, Nevada lifestyle. Ah, the sounds, smells, and joy of spring. It’s about here, folks. Be ready.
Flowers, blossoms, babies – spring in Northern Nevada is full of sights, sounds and smells.
When it comes to choosing professionals to assist you with your Real Estate needs… Experience is Priceless! Jim Valentine, RE/MAX Realty Affiliates, 775-781-3704. dpwtigers@hotmail.com

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