Past Pages for July 22 to 25, 2023


Saturday

150 Years Ago

Game law: The Washoe’s and Paiutes are bringing in great numbers of young wild fowls of one sort and another – fat young teal and mallards. The game law does not apply to the Indians, but it is debatable if they who purchase from them are not liable to prosecution for having the interdicted game in their possession.

140 Years Ago

Mark Twain’s new book: The last and greatest work of the world’s most popular humorist, Mark Twain is entitled “Life on the Mississippi.”

130 Years Ago

Pasturage: On the Kirman ranches, which contain over 400 acres situated one-half a mile from town. Milk cows taken and delivered daily. Terms $2 a month. William Smyth Lessee.

Iced milk: Pure Holsten ice milk at the Weiland lunch counter. Five cents a glass.

120 Years Ago

Chalmers and Alpine County: At the old town of Monitor there are signs of renewed activity. At different times this mine has produced many thousands of dollars of bullion. He is opening up the old workings of the Morning Star, and from what is known Mr. Curtz expects to enrich himself. Judge Arnot is also doing some mining and has secured the old exchequer mining ground. Mr. Chalmers spent millions of English money on these and never completed the work, as funds ran out.

70 Years Ago

Atomic age: (Washington). Fat free reducing diets may go out of fashion in the atomic age. The Atomic Energy Commission reported that research indicates “fat in the diet is essential for normal resistance to x-radiation.” The University of Southern California scientists found that rats whose diets included fat withstood radiation better than those who got no fat.

30 Years Ago

Advertisement: “Meadowdale Theatres, all seats $3.50 until 5:15 p.m. Now playing ‘Hocus Pocus,’ a Walt Disney picture with Bet Midler. Also playing is Steven Spielberg’s ‘Jurassic Park.’”


Sunday

150 Years Ago

New dies for Mint: New dies for the coinage of silver trade dollars were received by the superintendent of the Mint. They differ from the old dollar stamp: On one side sits the Goddess of Liberty on a bale, supposed to represent some article of commerce, holding in her left hand an olive branch, and in her right the motto “liberty.” At the base are inscribed the words: “In God we trust, 1873…” Eight thousand trade dollars will be coined with the new dies.

140 Years Ago

Born in Carson City: To the wife of O.P. Willis, a son.

Died in Carson City: Maggie I., daughter of James and Kattie Lius, aged 11 months and 14 days.

130 Years Ago

Beat the record: At Little’s Ranch, the German boys beat all previous hay baling records by baling 145 bales. The box record was formerly held in Genoa with 140 bales.

110 Years Ago

Damage at Kings Canyon: The heavy rains washed out the water breaks and forced the water down the road. The road is not in good condition to invite travel.

70 Years Ago

New Indian bill: A law to remove Nevada Indian colonies from federal control is being considered for introduction at the next session of congress. The proposal is part of the extensive efforts underway to remove Indians from restrictions of federal wardship and give them full rights off citizenship.

30 Years Ago

Hantavirus: The first Nevada victim of Hantavirus nearly died at Nye Regional Medical Center. The case is Nevada’s first and only the second involving a victim who hasn’t been in the Four Corner area of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and Utah.


Monday

150 Years Ago

Marriage: Mr. Alf Doten who is known to literature as “the lake posts” is to be married in the middle of Lake Tahoe as he has been pleased to announce. The name of the lady whom he will marry is Miss Mary E.C. Stoddard of Gold Hill, and they are to be wed on the broad bosom of said sheet of water.

140 Years Ago

Prison: Mr. P.C. Hyman, warden of the state prison, returned from San Francisco and informed us he made satisfactory arrangement with a man who is thoroughly acquainted with the business of manufacturing boots and shoes, to come up here and take supervision of the new cordwainery which is under construction.

130 Years Ago

Len Gallagher’s nerve: Len Gallagher, a brakeman on the V.&T. fell from the Virginia switch engine and was run over, losing his left arm. He was perfectly cool, and his display of nerves staggered the men who witnessed it. Dr. Lee attended to the case.

110 Years Ago

Hard luck: Sam Follett is having more than his share of hard luck. He was injured in a railroad accident and sent to the Sacramento hospital. Word comes that he has developed appendicitis. His mother left to be with him.

70 Years Ago

Wanted for Nevada, new homes: Nine thousand new homes are wanted for Nevada by 1960. This is based on the U.S. Census Bureau figures. The state is growing in population now at an average of over 100 new citizens a week. By 1960 there will be closest to 55,000 new Nevadans.

30 Years Ago

Kidnapped: Steve Wynn’s daughter Kevin was abducted from her home and then released two hours later after a $1.5 million ransom was paid. She was found bound in a car at the McCarran Airport.


Tuesday

150 Years Ago

Dick Mills: He is a Carson boy who has pitched in and learned the tinsmith and plumbers’ trade. He has been promoted to chief engineer of the Maxim Gas Works and does a great job supplying Zeke Edgecomb’s stable with a chime of gongs that are attached to a bell wire in the Ormsby House. Dick is prospering handsomely and looks out for Mrs. Mills and the babies.

140 Years Ago

All sorts: A gang of drunken young men were making a racket in the vicinity of a house of prostitution in the rear of the Ormsby House. Their language was something frightful to hear.

130 Years Ago

Advertisement: “The Keeley Institute at Carson City is now open for business… by Dr. Leslie E. Keeley, of Dwight Ill., for the cure of liquor, morphine or opium and tobacco habits and neurasthenia. For terms and other information address: The Keeley Institute, Carson City, Nevada.”

110 Years Ago

Rough going: Gene Howell and wife came in from Tonopah, using their own machine and selecting the Sodaville-Hawthorne route. They encountered pretty rough going on account of washouts and heavy rains, but still arrived several hours ahead of the big auto crowd that left Bishop in the morning.

70 Years Ago

Picnickers beware: The American Medical Association warned gardeners, picnickers and other devotees of the out-of-doors to beware of Eutrombicula Alredugesi, the scientific name for chiggers known as red bugs. Dr. Carl Potthoff of Albuquerque in “Today’s Health” tells how to prevent bites: flowers of sulfur dusted around the ankles. A two percent DDT powder is effective, sprinkle or rinse trouser legs with five percent emulsion of dimenthylphthalate. If you have been exposed to chiggers a local application of kerosene helps. If the bugs are creating intense itching, it can be relieved by applying a weak ammonia solution.

30 Years Ago

Feminist studies: Jean Ford will be reaching women’s studies through the Western Nevada Community College at the Stewart Training Center. She currently teaches women’s studies and political science at the University of Nevada, Reno.

Sue Ballew is the daughter of Bill Dolan, who wrote this column for the Nevada Appeal from 1947 until his death in 2006.

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